"Stonewall" Jackson Monument (Manassas)

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Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson Monument - Manassas NBP, Virginia - Photo is Copyright Michael Kendra, taken March 24, 2012.

Also Known As: Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson Monument

Battlefield: Manassas National Battlefield Park, Virginia

Location: Northeast of the Battlefield Park Visitor's Center

Map Coordinates: +38° 48' 47.31", -77° 31' 17.70"

Monument Text

THOMAS JONATHAN JACKSON 1824-1863
ERECTED BY STATE OF VIRGINIA UNDER ACT OF 1938
GOVERNORS GEORGE C. PERRY, JAMES H. PRICE
SPONSORS JOHN W. RUST, HENRY T. WICKHAM, AUBREY G. WEAVER
"THERE STANDS JACKSON LIKE A STONE WALL"
FIRST BATTLE OF MANASSAS, JULY 21, 1861

Monument Details

Artist: Joseph P Pollia

Dedicated: August 31, 1940 (Commissioned 1938.)

Dimensions: Sculpture: approx. 13 ft. x 3 ft. x 8 ft. 4 in.; Base: approx. 6 ft. x 5 ft. 10 in. x 10 ft. 2 in.

Dedication of the Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson Monument, just before the "Unveiling", August 31, 1940 - NPS Photo.

Description: With the establishment of Manassas National Battlefield Park in 1940, the Sons of Confederate Veterans transferred land holdings on Henry Hill to the federal government. As stipulated in the deed of conveyance, the National Park Service had to allow for the construction of a monument to General Thomas J. Jackson. In 1938, Virginia appropriated $25,000 for such a monument.

Dedication of the completed monument occurred on August 31, 1940, when a crowd estimated at over 2,000 participated in the dedication ceremonies on Henry Hill. The statue of Jackson, covered from view, stood before the audience several yards away from a speaker’s platform.

Following a performance by the Quantico Marine Corps Band, Virginia Governor James H. Price addressed the crowd. The Richmond Times Dispatch noted that the governor’s remarks linked the record of Jackson to the anxieties of Americans regarding the war in Europe that had yet to directly involve the United States. “In honoring one of the greatest soldiers of the Anglo-Saxon race,” he said, “we are letting the world know that we are ready to take up the challenge of arbitrary power, ready to give our all in defense of that freedom for which our forefathers so often fought in days gone by.”

With the conclusion of Governor Price’s remarks, the statue was unveiled to the crowd by Julia Preston, a great granddaughter of “Stonewall” Jackson, and Ann H. Rust, daughter of Virginia State Senator John Rust, who had been a big supporter of appropriating funds for the statue.

The statue uncovered, newspaper editor and historian Dr. Douglass Southall Freeman delivered the keynote address. Echoing the themes of Governor Price in tying Jackson to the turmoil in Europe, Dr. Freeman stated that “If America faces another war . . . these men must be trained—trained according to the methods of Jackson, and they must be under the same hard and stern discipline which made Jackson at times hated by the same men who would nevertheless follow him . . .”

The black polished bronze sculpture depicts General “Stonewall” Jackson and his horse “Old Sorrel” facing northwest, approx scale of sculpture is 1:1.5. General Jackson is sculpted as sitting straight up with his arms at his side. His left arm is bent with his fist at his waist holding the reins. He wears a cap, riding gloves, knee length boots and a cape. His sword hangs on his left side. His horse “Old Sorrel” stands with all four feet firmly rooted in the ground and is braced leaning forward with his head down.

The flagstone pavers create a patio around the polished black granite base. The granite base is comprised of vertical granite slabs forming a large block 10’ in width and 6’ in height. The northeast and southwest granite slabs are smaller and project outwards 6”. There are gray streaks in the granite from a lightning strike and inscriptions carved into the granite on all four sides.

The site is near the approximate position Jackson was holding at First Manassas, July 21, 1861, when he earned his nickname of "Stonewall." The location chosen for the monument on the hill crest reflected aesthetic concerns more than historical accuracy: Jackson's brigade actually occupied the reverse slope of the hill to the east of the monument.

Cost: $25,000.00

Further Reading

  • Adams, Shae (2011) "Cultural Distortion: The Dedication of the Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson Monument at Manassas National Battlefield Park," The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era: Vol. 2: Iss. 1, Article 3.

Available at: http://cupola.gettysburg.edu/gcjcwe/vol2/iss1/3

Additional Photos

Battlefield Location Map